Difficulty LevelThe Paradiddle-diddle (RLRRLL) can be thought as the Paradiddle (RLRR) with an extra double at the end (LL).

Unlike the Paradiddle though, the hands do not alternate meaning the right hand always starts the rudiment (if right handed). This makes it a really cool pattern to use because of its ease of movement around the drums.

The Paradiddle-diddle is a six note pattern so it naturally fits into triplets. This lesson will be looking at the rudiment played through triplets but it could also be played through 16th’s or 32nd notes if care is taken not to lose the downbeat…I guess that’s a lesson for another day.

 

The Basic Rudiment

Pardiddle-diddle

This is the Paradiddle-diddle written out in case you haven’t seen it before. I have written beneath the bar the sticking for both right and left handed players. If you really want to advance your playing then try to master both stickings.

Accent Pattern 1

Pardiddle-diddle

There are two main and rather obvious ways this rudiment tends to be accented. The first involves accenting the first note of the rudiment.

Accent Pattern 2

Pardiddle-diddle

While the second pattern accents both the first and the second note. Again, if you want to learn this rudiment properly then try to get comfortable with both accent patterns.

 

Orchestration

The rudiments allow drummers to move around the drums and play interesting patterns in ways that, if played with just singles, would be hard or impossible to do. Its this combination of singles and doubles that you find in the Paradiddle-diddle that makes it so fun to orchestrate around the drum kit.

There are so many ways the rudiment can be played around the drums. This lesson will only be able to look at a just few of the possibilities.

The next five orchestrations are some of the most popular ways I have heard the rudiment being used but feel free (in fact, I encourage you) to try different combinations and drum sources.

Variation 1

Pardiddle-diddle

Moving the first note to a different drum.

Variation 2

Pardiddle-diddle

Moving the first and second note to a different drum.

Variation 3

Pardiddle-diddle

Moving the first and second note to two separate drums.

Variation 4

Pardiddle-diddle

I heard Akiro Jimbo use this orchestration on one of his DVD’s and it sounds super impressive when sped up. Try to make the movement from the cymbal to the Tom-Tom flow smoothly into one fluid motion in order to help speed the lick up.

Variation 5

Pardiddle-diddle

 

Linear Style Drum Beat

The Paradiddle-diddle can also be played between the Hi-Hat/Ride and Snare drum to create a funky sounding linear drum beat.

Linear Beat 1

Pardiddle-diddle

The left hand stays on the Snare drum and plays as quietly as possible (ghost notes). This will help the groove to sound funkier and more dynamic.

The right hand moves from the Ride cymbal to play the accented Snare drum on Beats 2 and 4.

Linear Beat 2

Pardiddle-diddle

This is exactly the same as Linear Beat 1 but the left hand is now playing on the Hi-Hat instead of the Snare drum.

 

The Jazz Ride Pattern

Some drummers might have spotted what the right hand was actually playing in the previous two linear drum beats. The right hand part of the Paradiddle-diddle is actually the “Jazz Ride Cymbal” pattern, or the “Spang-a-lang” pattern.

This means that the rudiment can be used when trying to learn the Jazz Ride pattern. The only thing to be aware of is that in order to start the Jazz Ride pattern correctly an extra three notes are added to the beginning of the Paradiddle-diddle (RLL) which, in essence, are just the last three notes of the Paradiddle-diddle.

Here’s the pattern.

Pardiddle-diddle

In other words, the Paradiddle-diddle started half way through creates the Jazz Ride Cymbal pattern with the right hand.

 

Bass Drum Substitution

One way of taking this rudiment to the next level is to substitute some of the notes with the bass drum. Not only does this create cool linear fills between the hands and feet but it also creates new and interesting orchestrations.

The next four examples are just a few of the many possibilities. Any note or combination of notes can be substituted for the bass drum so try out your own ideas as well

Variation 1

Pardiddle-diddle

This is my favourite pattern as the bass drum at the end really adds a kick (no pun intended) to the fill.

Variation 2

Pardiddle-diddle

This is actually Variation 4 from the orchestration part of this lesson but with the last note of the Paradiddle-diddle substituted for a bass drum.

Variation 3

Pardiddle-diddle

Variation 4

Pardiddle-diddle

Starting the rudiment with a bass drum gives the pattern a very definite down beat but can be tricky to follow with the left hand. See what you think.

 

Six Stroke Roll

Another cool thing that you might not have spotted is that the Six Stroke Roll and the Paradiddle-diddle are actually the same sticking. In fact, the Six Stroke Roll is sometimes referred to as the “Inverted Paradiddle-Diddle” because of this.

Pardiddle-diddle

The Six Stroke Roll starts on the second single note of the Paradiddle-diddle with an accent at the beginning and end.

In essence then, by learning one rudiment you’re essentially learning the other.

 

Conclusion

I hope I have shown you the many possibilities and cool uses of the Paradiddle-diddle within your playing. I think its one of the most useful rudiments to learn because of its multiple and surprising uses. Remember that it can be played through any subdivision you wish and shouldn’t just be used with triplets…that would be a waste of a great lick!

If you’re struggling with this rudiment then I recommend you visit the Paradiddle lesson to help you with the basics. A free full vdeo drum lesson teaching the Six Stroke Roll (Para-Diddle-Diddle variation) can be viewed by clicking here.

 

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